Surface Coating / Alfa Chemistry

Powder X-ray Diffraction Facilities

INQUIRY

Powder X-ray Diffraction (P-XRD) is a versatile and non-destructive characterization technique. It has the benefit of concurrently characterizing precursors and final products, as well as providing a complete qualitative depiction of the sample's chemical composition and crystal structure.

When X-rays are focused on the crystal, they diffract in a pattern that is unique to the structure. The diffraction pattern is derived from the material's powder rather than a single crystal in powder X-ray diffraction. Powder diffraction does not need to create a single crystal, so it is more direct and convenient than single crystal diffraction. Powder X-ray diffraction can also be used to get the diffraction pattern of crystalline solid bulk materials, rather than single crystals, which may or may not represent the complete material. The intensity is plotted according to the detector angle, 2θ in the diffraction pattern.

Alfa Chemistry's analytical laboratory has a variety of powder X-ray diffraction instruments that can run samples under restricted sample preparation conditions. For more information about our P-XRD facility, please contact Alfa Chemistry.

PANalytical X'Pert Pro MPD for High Temperature and X-Ray Reflection Measurement

The instrument has a copper X-ray source with Bragg-Brentano geometry, as well as two high-temperature vacuum furnaces that can endure temperatures of up to 2000 °C and 900 °C (10 bar).

High Temperature and X-Ray Reflection Measurement

An open Euler stand on the instrument can be utilized for X-ray reflectometry (XRR) or residual stress measurements. The vertical depth and distribution of the detection film are measured using an X-ray reflectometer. The instrument's horizontal geometry allows it to measure solid-air and liquid-air interfaces. Thin film technologies such as catalytic interfaces, surfactant layers, adsorbent polymer layers, and biofilms have all benefited from this.

The apparatus can also be used to detect residual stress or do X-ray reflectometry (XRR):

  • The vertical depth and distribution of the film can be measured using an X-ray reflectometer. The instrument's horizontal geometry allows it to measure solid-air and liquid-air interfaces. Thin film technologies such as catalytic interfaces, surfactant layers, adsorbent polymer layers, and biofilms have all benefited from this.
  • X-ray diffraction may be used to measure the tensile and compressive residual stresses in polycrystalline materials by measuring the lattice spacing in different sample orientations. Machining, heat treatment, or deformation can all create residual stress. This approach is near-surface and enables for in-depth investigation.

Our products and services are for research use only and cannot be used for any clinical purpose.

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